Private Foundation Scholarship Questions

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For students enrolling in college, financial aid can come in three forms: Federal, Institutional, and Private (or third-party). For those seeking aid options in addition to federal and institutional awards, researching private scholarships may prove highly rewarding and beneficial.

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Providing a safe environment for MK’s as they transition into college and American culture

 

Image by <a href="https://pixabay.com/users/529683-529683/?utm_source=link-attribution&amp;utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=1247143">Bogdana Popova</a> from <a href="https://pixabay.com/?utm_source=link-attribution&amp;utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=1247143">Pixabay</a>
Image by Bogdana Popova from Pixabay

 

Choosing a college is a big deal no matter what your background happens to be.

Certain aspects of missionary life in particular can make that process even more complicated and intimidating.  Missionary kids (MK’s) and third-culture kids (TCK’s) face unique challenges when it comes time to make college decisions.

  • Moving far (1000’s of miles) from family and friends
  • Long-distance planning and wondering if you really, actually understand what is expected (“lost in translation” is a real hazard)
  • Trying to anticipate transportation needs (no car, no US license, and quite possibly no local connections)
  • Looking the part (looking like typical American kids) but being completely different
  • Stepping out by faith while still making wise financial decisions (typically, MK’s cannot legally hold a job in a foreign country and might not even have access to a US bank account)
  • Learning a new culture (culture shock) while attempting to handle all of the above

That is a lot to navigate on your own — especially when you’re 18! Continue reading

Spring Break… what to do?

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Photo by Ibrahim Asad from Pexels

Spring Break.

These two words mean something different to everyone: road trips, beach days, sleeping in, camping, hiking, or maybe for you it means working extra hours to get ahead.

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Photo by Ibrahim Asad from Pexels

Sadly, in general, the term “spring break” tends to hold a negative connotation.  Party-crazy crowds and all that entails seems to take center stage both as a societal norm and even in the news and social media!

However, as a Christian college student, standards of ethical and moral behavior should naturally dictate that the activities of choice during spring break (any break, actually) stand out from the mainstream “spring break beach bash” mentality.  Biblical truth and the responsibility to “shine as lights in the world” should be ever-present in our minds — even on vacation!

Does this mean you must spend the week in prayer and fasting and abstain from any type of fun?  No.  But it does mean that your identity as a Christ-follower must be your point of reference and what determines your decision to engage in any given activity.

So… what are your plans this spring break?  Will you skip town for the week?  Or are you staying local due to your work schedule or other factors?  Leaving town is always nice, but if you’re sticking around, there are quite a few fun experiences to be had right here in Jacksonville and surrounding areas.  Here is a round up of some of our favorites:

Entertainment:

Outdoors:

Volunteer:

For the History Buff:

Low-key:

However you choose to spend spring break, remember that you are called to be salt and light to a world who needs Christ! 

#StriveToRise

 

 

10 Ways TBC Maintains a Safe Campus

img_912228129Safety is always important – no matter what you do or where you go.

Here at Trinity Baptist College we not only understand that, but we make it a priority to make our campus a safe, secure, and comfortable environment for students. We go the extra mile to make this campus a place where students can focus on their studies and their personal growth and not be hampered by safety concerns.

So what does that look like?  What measures does TBC employ to keep the campus a comfortable, friendly environment that still keeps a watchful eye?

  • 24-hour in-house security which includes over 150 surveillance cameras; TBC’s Director of Security is a reservist in the sheriff’s department.
  • 24-hour JSO (Jacksonville Sherriff’s Office) stop station on campus – this means there is a high and nearly constant police officer presence on campus
  • Regularly scheduled safety inspections of buildings and codes
  • Annual reporting in conjunction with the JSO*
  • Internal processes set up for efficient communication of alerts and drills
  • Implementation of restricted ID key-card access to academic buildings and dormitories
  • Intercom and video-call systems installed at key entry points to academic buildings
  • Strict campus-wide policy of no drugs, no alcohol, no tobacco
  • Enforcement of our Standard of Conduct as outlined in our Student Success Guide
  • Multiple buildings on campus double as actual shelters (they are built like tanks and are a safe place to camp out in bad weather)
  • RA’s are CPR certified and receive ongoing training on dealing with mediation, confrontation, and crisis situations. This includes (but is not limited to) Clery Act/CSA** training and emergency response training.

In addition to actual processes, training, and physical methods of maintaining the security of our campus, our student body, faculty, staff, and administration increase our campus safety themselves simply by their influence in everyday campus life.

  • Student Leaders receive ongoing personal leadership training. This builds a network of spiritually-minded individuals who look out for the well-being of their fellow classmates.
  • Our 12:1 student/faculty ratio promotes a family atmosphere. This allows for individual mentorship to happen naturally.
  • Our close-knit student body means students know each other and any unusual or suspicious behavior is easily spotted.
  • Weekly chapels where the entire student body gathers together emphasize spiritual growth and maturity – this alone encourages a high moral standard.

We are thankful to have a team of faculty and staff who care about the physical and spiritual well-being of our students.  This level of concern makes an undeniable impact on the overall environment of our campus.

 

*TBC completes and submits an Annual Security Report and Annual Fire Safety Report to the Department of Education as mandated by the Clery Act.  The reporting is done in conjunction with the JSO.  To view the most recent copy of the safety report, click here.

**Campus Security Authority

Book suggestions for the non-reader, the bookworm, and everyone in between

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Are you still working on your reading list for this year? 

Sometimes, trying to decide what to read is half the battle.  If you are not much of a reader, you may be hesitant to pick up a title without a solid recommendation.  On the other hand, if you are an avid reader, you may have such a long list of want-to-reads that you can’t make up your mind what to start next!  So many books; so little time.

In an attempt to eliminate some of the guesswork for you, we assembled a short list of titles to share below.  This list includes a variety of genres ranging from classic novels to Christian living, and most of them are fairly easy reads as well. 

We asked around and got input from our English department, our Administration, and even the students!  You may have already read many of these – or maybe not.  Either way, we hope you find something that sparks your interest.

Most of these titles can be found in digital and audio formats as well.  This makes it even more convenient for you!  Especially the audio format – you can listen while you walk to class, work out, or clean your dorm room! (Yes, that was a hint in case you were wondering.)

Leadership/Personal Growth:

  • How To Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
  • Ordering Your Private World by Gordon MacDonald
  • The Making of A Leader by Dr. J. Robert Clinton
  • Spiritual Leadership by J. Oswald Sanders
  • The One Thing by Gary Keller
  • Grit by Angela Duckworth

Inspirational/Devotional:

  • You Version Bible App Devotional Plans
  • New Morning Mercies by Paul Tripp
  • My Utmost For His Highest by Oswald Chambers
  • The Insanity of God by Nik Ripkin;
  • Knowing God by J.I. Packer
  • None Like Him: 10 Ways God Is Different from Us (and Why That’s a Good Thing) by Jen Wilkin

Biography/Autobiography:

  • Jonathan Edwards by Lain Murray
  • Bonhoeffer by Eric Metaxas
  • Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow
  • Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave by Frederick Douglass

Contemporary Fiction:

  • The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
  • A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman
  • Trevorode the Defender by Holly Bebernitz (former TBC professor)

Classics Everyone Should Read:

  • The Odyssey by Homer (translated by Emily Wilson)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  • My Antonia by Willa Cather
  • The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Do you have any more suggestions to add?  What other titles are on your reading list? 

 

*Note: TBC does not necessarily endorse the entire content of these books or other writings by these authors.  This list is provided as a starting reference to assist you in finding material that is helpful and/or of interest to you.

The public library: a whole new world

Have you heard? Libraries are cool again!

When was the last time you set foot in your library?  Or checked out their website? Or their app? 

If you think the library is an out-of-date concept – think again! 

For starters: free Wi-Fi and gobs of downloadable digital content.

Yes, of course, libraries do still have all the old-school stuff like physical books (much to the book-lover’s delight) narrated books on CD, and films on DVD.  However, these days, their content has expanded and morphed to remain accessible, useful, and convenient to new generations of curious minds.  

Here are a few examples of what you can find at a public library:

Digital Content: With the help of apps like Hoopla, and OverDrive (among others) libraries now offer an ever-expanding selection of digital content, and you can borrow all of it for free! From movies and books to periodicals and music. You download the app, select the content you want, and get on with it!  This means you don’t even have to make it down to the library to check out a book – and you don’t have to worry about returning it on time because it simply disappears from your device on the date it is due back!

Tutoring: Need help with a certain subject?  Check out their tutoring schedule.  In some cases, you can even fill out a request form and they will contact you if a tutor is available.

Meeting spaces: Libraries have rooms available for you to use – for meetings, for study groups, for tutoring, etc.  Some rooms are even equipped with projectors, laptop connections, etc.  The smaller rooms are typically first-come, first-served, while the larger meetings rooms require reservations.

Free Courses: Check out their calendar of events.  Here in Jacksonville you can find everything from beginner guitar lessons to digital photography, ESL, Yoga, and basic coding!  (Each branch offers different things, so make sure you are looking at the right location!)

Copy/Print/Scan: Public computers are available to library card holders and guest passes (“guests” being those who do not have a library card) are available for a nominal fee.  Printers and copiers are accessible to library card-holders for a small fee to cover supplies (check pricing at your branch).  Some locations even offer mobile printing and 3D printing! Yes, that kind of 3-printing where you can actually create a three dimensional object!  

Fine Arts: Some locations occasionally offer free concerts, presentations, galleries, exhibitions, craft fairs, and debates.  The Jacksonville Main library features a Lunch @ the Lounge concert on a monthly basis, where you can bring your lunch, grab a table, and enjoy live guitar music.  They also feature a monthly Music @ Main Sunday Intermezzo.

Work space: Of course, libraries also have lots of space to sit and read or study. Coffee shops may be a popular place to go do some homework, but libraries are much more spacious and less chaotic. Plus, you don’t have to make a purchase in order to hang out at a table for three hours. So, if blowing your budget on coffee and pastries is an issue for you, the library is an ideal alternative!

Variety and personality: Some public library buildings are massive works of art with beautiful design and architecture; others are tiny and quaint.  The Jacksonville Main Library is a good example of a large and beautiful building.  It even has murals and a roof-top patio complete with potted trees and a fountain!  Others locations have cozy indoor spaces, craft rooms, and tiny theaters.  The branch closest to our TBC campus (West Branch) offers a quiet space with comfy seating, charging stations, and a fireplace!  The Willowbranch location is housed in a gorgeous building next to a public park and across the street from a community garden – a beautiful setting to sit and read!

When all is said and done, the public library is pretty much the perfect place to start if you are interested in what you can do, learn, enjoy, and use for FREE in your area!  Practically the only prerequisite for accessing it all is having a (free) library card.

Keep in mind that every library in every city will have different things available.  Much of it depends on the size of the city, but even small-town libraries can have some great perks!  Sign up for their newsletter – it will give you a run-down of community happenings and any new things coming to your library. Bottom line: it is ALWAYS a good idea to try the library first – you never know what you will find!

6 ways to help your brain this winter break

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Winter break is upon us!  You are probably holding your breath for that glorious moment when you turn in our last exam!  Finally, you can sleep in without missing your first class or paying for it in a low grade!

First up on your to-do list: catch up on sleep and binge-watch your favorite TV shows.

Sounds like the PERFECT winter break routine.

Continue reading

Establishing credit: two baby steps and a warning

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Let’s say you feel ready to handle the responsibility of credit and all that entails.  How do you get started? 

Before we even get into that, let’s take a moment to revisit the main take-away from our last post [Credit: what is it and why should you care?]  Let’s say it all together now: No credit is better than bad credit! 

Yes, we are starting with the warning mentioned in the title.  That is because it is so important!

Moving on.

Demonstrating that you are responsible with your finances is key to qualifying for a loan or credit card… but how can you prove that you are financially responsible with credit when you don’t yet qualify for the very things that help you build that credit?

Baby Step #1: Open a bank account in your name, if you don’t already have one.  Try your best to deposit on a consistent basis. Even if it is only a few dollars a month.  It all ads up, and a history of deposits looks good even if they are small.

Baby Step #2 Apply for a secured credit card.  You use it like a regular credit card, but the spending limit must be backed by a deposit.  (Your spending limit is typically dictated by the amount of your deposit.)  You can use the card to pay bills or make purchases, and you will be responsible for paying off your balance just as you would with a regular credit card.  Another option is to become an authorized on someone else’s credit card.  This means that the other person will need to be able to trust you! (A typical scenario is for a parent to add their child as an authorized user on their card.)  They will be held responsible personally for any bad decisions made with the card, so you will be expected to be on your best behavior!  On the flip side, your name can benefit from the correct usage of that card.

Looking for more baby steps/ways to get started on building your credit?  There are several other valid options, each of which have their own set of pros and cons.  Nerdwallet.com may be helpful to you as you navigate the world of finances and learn what will work best for you.   This page on their website offers several more options for building credit from scratch: https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/finance/how-to-build-credit/  

Ultimately, your level of responsibility will determine how well they work for you.

What is a good target age for establishing credit?

The decision to use credit or not and when to begin establishing that credit is a subjective one.  Every person has different goals and varying degrees of responsibility.

That being said, you will need to be 18 years of age or order to apply for most credit cards, but can open a bank account when you are much younger (sometimes as young as age 13).

Warning: Building good credit is fairly easily done, and can be accomplished in just a few months.  Bad credit can haunt you for hears.  It is not a bad idea to work toward building good credit while still in high school.   However, your self-control plays a significant role in the success of this plan.  Some students are better off waiting.  Be honest with yourself and seek advice.  Make sure that the temptation to spend is something you can handle.

 

 

 

TBC soccer coach earns U.S. Soccer Federation B License

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Congratulations to our women’s soccer coach, Asithorn “Noom” Romyanond, on his recent outstanding achievement of the U.S. Soccer Federation B License!  This is no small accomplishment – for perspective, there is approximately one B-licensed coach for every 3000 US Soccer players.  This significant milestone is a result of Coach Noom’s dedication and hard work, a trait he carries with him in his personal life as well as on the athletic field.

This success brings with it well-deserved recognition and it is an honor to have Coach Noom as the women’s soccer coach at Trinity Baptist College.  His extensive training heightens his natural talent and love for the game and serves to further demonstrate his brilliant capability as a coach.  The TBC women’s soccer team benefits directly from his expertise as they receive high-level training under his coaching.

Coach Noom graduated from Ohio University Master of Sciences in Recreation and Sport Sciences with a Concentration in Soccer Coaching. He now holds a United States Soccer Federation “B” license and NSCAA Goal Keeper Level 2 Diploma.

Noom grew up playing street soccer and for his school teams in Bangkok, Thailand. Those experiences continue to inspire him to love the beautiful game for life. In 2001, he came to the USA and settled in Jacksonville. He and his wife Lindsey have five children.  For more about Coach Noom, visit http://www.tbc.edu/womenssoccer

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About U.S. Soccer Federation: The United States Soccer Federation, commonly referred to as U.S. Soccer, is a 501 nonprofit organization and the official governing body of the sport of soccer in the United States. Learn more about soccer licenses here: http://cd03.ussoccer.com/