Podcast suggestions from TBC’s VP of Student Affairs

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What are you doing this Christmas break to re-charge?

So often we think of re-charging as a chance to sleep, sit on the couch, binge-watch shows and movies, take a walk, go to the beach (because in Florida, we go to the beach in December), etc.  And while resting is definitely part of re-charging, there is a real danger in allowing ourselves to simply immerse ourselves in whatever is in front of us without any intentionality.

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The Student {athlete} Life at TBC

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The chance to keep playing their favorite sport while earning a degree is the ultimate goal of many young people.

The student athlete life is exciting and fun!  There are plenty of opportunities to make friends, travel, enjoy healthy competition, and even make a name for themselves.

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3 Things To Learn The Summer Before College

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There are so many things to do the summer before you begin college!  Assuming you have already been accepted and know where you will attend, your attention may shift from submitting documents and meeting deadlines to accomplishing something on your bucket list or learning practical life skills.  Continue reading

Spring Break… what to do?

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Photo by Ibrahim Asad from Pexels

Spring Break.

These two words mean something different to everyone: road trips, beach days, sleeping in, camping, hiking, or maybe for you it means working extra hours to get ahead.

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Book suggestions for the non-reader, the bookworm, and everyone in between

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Are you still working on your reading list for this year? 

Sometimes, trying to decide what to read is half the battle.  If you are not much of a reader, you may be hesitant to pick up a title without a solid recommendation.  On the other hand, if you are an avid reader, you may have such a long list of want-to-reads that you can’t make up your mind what to start next!  So many books; so little time.

In an attempt to eliminate some of the guesswork for you, we assembled a short list of titles to share below.  This list includes a variety of genres ranging from classic novels to Christian living, and most of them are fairly easy reads as well. 

We asked around and got input from our English department, our Administration, and even the students!  You may have already read many of these – or maybe not.  Either way, we hope you find something that sparks your interest.

Most of these titles can be found in digital and audio formats as well.  This makes it even more convenient for you!  Especially the audio format – you can listen while you walk to class, work out, or clean your dorm room! (Yes, that was a hint in case you were wondering.)

Leadership/Personal Growth:

  • How To Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
  • Ordering Your Private World by Gordon MacDonald
  • The Making of A Leader by Dr. J. Robert Clinton
  • Spiritual Leadership by J. Oswald Sanders
  • The One Thing by Gary Keller
  • Grit by Angela Duckworth

Inspirational/Devotional:

  • You Version Bible App Devotional Plans
  • New Morning Mercies by Paul Tripp
  • My Utmost For His Highest by Oswald Chambers
  • The Insanity of God by Nik Ripkin;
  • Knowing God by J.I. Packer
  • None Like Him: 10 Ways God Is Different from Us (and Why That’s a Good Thing) by Jen Wilkin

Biography/Autobiography:

  • Jonathan Edwards by Lain Murray
  • Bonhoeffer by Eric Metaxas
  • Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow
  • Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave by Frederick Douglass

Contemporary Fiction:

  • The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
  • A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman
  • Trevorode the Defender by Holly Bebernitz (former TBC professor)

Classics Everyone Should Read:

  • The Odyssey by Homer (translated by Emily Wilson)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  • My Antonia by Willa Cather
  • The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Do you have any more suggestions to add?  What other titles are on your reading list? 

 

*Note: TBC does not necessarily endorse the entire content of these books or other writings by these authors.  This list is provided as a starting reference to assist you in finding material that is helpful and/or of interest to you.

6 ways to help your brain this winter break

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Winter break is upon us!  You are probably holding your breath for that glorious moment when you turn in our last exam!  Finally, you can sleep in without missing your first class or paying for it in a low grade!

First up on your to-do list: catch up on sleep and binge-watch your favorite TV shows.

Sounds like the PERFECT winter break routine.

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Establishing credit: two baby steps and a warning

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Let’s say you feel ready to handle the responsibility of credit and all that entails.  How do you get started? 

Before we even get into that, let’s take a moment to revisit the main take-away from our last post [Credit: what is it and why should you care?]  Let’s say it all together now: No credit is better than bad credit! 

Yes, we are starting with the warning mentioned in the title.  That is because it is so important!

Moving on.

Demonstrating that you are responsible with your finances is key to qualifying for a loan or credit card… but how can you prove that you are financially responsible with credit when you don’t yet qualify for the very things that help you build that credit?

Baby Step #1: Open a bank account in your name, if you don’t already have one.  Try your best to deposit on a consistent basis. Even if it is only a few dollars a month.  It all ads up, and a history of deposits looks good even if they are small.

Baby Step #2 Apply for a secured credit card.  You use it like a regular credit card, but the spending limit must be backed by a deposit.  (Your spending limit is typically dictated by the amount of your deposit.)  You can use the card to pay bills or make purchases, and you will be responsible for paying off your balance just as you would with a regular credit card.  Another option is to become an authorized on someone else’s credit card.  This means that the other person will need to be able to trust you! (A typical scenario is for a parent to add their child as an authorized user on their card.)  They will be held responsible personally for any bad decisions made with the card, so you will be expected to be on your best behavior!  On the flip side, your name can benefit from the correct usage of that card.

Looking for more baby steps/ways to get started on building your credit?  There are several other valid options, each of which have their own set of pros and cons.  Nerdwallet.com may be helpful to you as you navigate the world of finances and learn what will work best for you.   This page on their website offers several more options for building credit from scratch: https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/finance/how-to-build-credit/  

Ultimately, your level of responsibility will determine how well they work for you.

What is a good target age for establishing credit?

The decision to use credit or not and when to begin establishing that credit is a subjective one.  Every person has different goals and varying degrees of responsibility.

That being said, you will need to be 18 years of age or order to apply for most credit cards, but can open a bank account when you are much younger (sometimes as young as age 13).

Warning: Building good credit is fairly easily done, and can be accomplished in just a few months.  Bad credit can haunt you for hears.  It is not a bad idea to work toward building good credit while still in high school.   However, your self-control plays a significant role in the success of this plan.  Some students are better off waiting.  Be honest with yourself and seek advice.  Make sure that the temptation to spend is something you can handle.

 

 

 

Three ways to maximize your study sessions.

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At this point in your life you are very familiar with classwork, exams, and, of course, studying.  If you’re in college, no doubt you are studying.  At least a little!  The question is, are you studying effectively?  Continue reading

Dealing With Goodbye

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People get weird when it’s time to say goodbye.  Especially when it is a long-term goodbye.  Yes, even adults.

Maybe you can identify yourself in one of the following examples:

  • You get hyper and say ridiculous things that are completely immature or flat out make no sense. But you continue to jabber on and on and on, following no particular train of thought, anxious to plow through becauseyoucan’thandlethestressandwantitobeoveralready.
  • You get super sensitive and cry about every look, feeling, or slight inconvenience.  Why did she look at me like that?  *sniff*  He really said that?  *tear trickles down cheek*   Why won’t this suitcase just zip up already?  *full-on river of tears floods face*
  • You go waaaaaay off the charts in the opposite direction and distance yourself emotionally. Your stoic expression rivals George Washington’s likeness on the one dollar bill.

What is it about saying goodbye that throws people into a tailspin?  It’s like we morph into overgrown toddlers hiding behind our parents on the first day of preschool.  Here’s the good news: getting weird about goodbyes is actually pretty normal.

The simple answer?  Goodbyes are hard.  You cope by pulling out whatever internal armor you have at your disposal.  And while that might get you through the moment, it may cause you to miss out on the positives to be found in the circumstances or, worse, cause the goodbye to end on a negative note.

As you approach THE goodbye that is dropping off your child at college, you may be wondering how you will handle the scenario.  In your mind’s eye this young adult is still eight years old and needs help combing his/her hair.  (There are so many moving parts, memories, mixed feelings, and uncertainties about this transition that it is easy to dwell on the negatives and become overwhelmed.)  Instead, try to focus on the positives!

If you need some help coming up with those positives, maybe these will help get you started:

  • The simple fact that they have reached this milestone means they are growing, learning, and taking strides toward adulthood.
  • They are here largely because of YOU and your support, guidance, and advice.
  • Hopefully, this season of their life will help them continue to mature and impact the world around them in amazing ways.
  • They are confident enough to take this step and venture out on their own.
  • ______________________ (Your turn! Fill in the blank!)

Here’s to a successful shift from high school to college… make it memorable! (In a positive way!)