Private Foundation Scholarship Questions

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For students enrolling in college, financial aid can come in three forms: Federal, Institutional, and Private (or third-party). For those seeking aid options in addition to federal and institutional awards, researching private scholarships may prove highly rewarding and beneficial.

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Spring Break… what to do?

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Photo by Ibrahim Asad from Pexels

Spring Break.

These two words mean something different to everyone: road trips, beach days, sleeping in, camping, hiking, or maybe for you it means working extra hours to get ahead.

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Photo by Ibrahim Asad from Pexels

Sadly, in general, the term “spring break” tends to hold a negative connotation.  Party-crazy crowds and all that entails seems to take center stage both as a societal norm and even in the news and social media!

However, as a Christian college student, standards of ethical and moral behavior should naturally dictate that the activities of choice during spring break (any break, actually) stand out from the mainstream “spring break beach bash” mentality.  Biblical truth and the responsibility to “shine as lights in the world” should be ever-present in our minds — even on vacation!

Does this mean you must spend the week in prayer and fasting and abstain from any type of fun?  No.  But it does mean that your identity as a Christ-follower must be your point of reference and what determines your decision to engage in any given activity.

So… what are your plans this spring break?  Will you skip town for the week?  Or are you staying local due to your work schedule or other factors?  Leaving town is always nice, but if you’re sticking around, there are quite a few fun experiences to be had right here in Jacksonville and surrounding areas.  Here is a round up of some of our favorites:

Entertainment:

Outdoors:

Volunteer:

For the History Buff:

Low-key:

However you choose to spend spring break, remember that you are called to be salt and light to a world who needs Christ! 

#StriveToRise

 

 

Book suggestions for the non-reader, the bookworm, and everyone in between

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Are you still working on your reading list for this year? 

Sometimes, trying to decide what to read is half the battle.  If you are not much of a reader, you may be hesitant to pick up a title without a solid recommendation.  On the other hand, if you are an avid reader, you may have such a long list of want-to-reads that you can’t make up your mind what to start next!  So many books; so little time.

In an attempt to eliminate some of the guesswork for you, we assembled a short list of titles to share below.  This list includes a variety of genres ranging from classic novels to Christian living, and most of them are fairly easy reads as well. 

We asked around and got input from our English department, our Administration, and even the students!  You may have already read many of these – or maybe not.  Either way, we hope you find something that sparks your interest.

Most of these titles can be found in digital and audio formats as well.  This makes it even more convenient for you!  Especially the audio format – you can listen while you walk to class, work out, or clean your dorm room! (Yes, that was a hint in case you were wondering.)

Leadership/Personal Growth:

  • How To Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
  • Ordering Your Private World by Gordon MacDonald
  • The Making of A Leader by Dr. J. Robert Clinton
  • Spiritual Leadership by J. Oswald Sanders
  • The One Thing by Gary Keller
  • Grit by Angela Duckworth

Inspirational/Devotional:

  • You Version Bible App Devotional Plans
  • New Morning Mercies by Paul Tripp
  • My Utmost For His Highest by Oswald Chambers
  • The Insanity of God by Nik Ripkin;
  • Knowing God by J.I. Packer
  • None Like Him: 10 Ways God Is Different from Us (and Why That’s a Good Thing) by Jen Wilkin

Biography/Autobiography:

  • Jonathan Edwards by Lain Murray
  • Bonhoeffer by Eric Metaxas
  • Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow
  • Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave by Frederick Douglass

Contemporary Fiction:

  • The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
  • A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman
  • Trevorode the Defender by Holly Bebernitz (former TBC professor)

Classics Everyone Should Read:

  • The Odyssey by Homer (translated by Emily Wilson)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  • My Antonia by Willa Cather
  • The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Do you have any more suggestions to add?  What other titles are on your reading list? 

 

*Note: TBC does not necessarily endorse the entire content of these books or other writings by these authors.  This list is provided as a starting reference to assist you in finding material that is helpful and/or of interest to you.

6 ways to help your brain this winter break

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Winter break is upon us!  You are probably holding your breath for that glorious moment when you turn in our last exam!  Finally, you can sleep in without missing your first class or paying for it in a low grade!

First up on your to-do list: catch up on sleep and binge-watch your favorite TV shows.

Sounds like the PERFECT winter break routine.

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