The Student {athlete} Life at TBC

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The chance to keep playing their favorite sport while earning a degree is the ultimate goal of many young people.

The student athlete life is exciting and fun!  There are plenty of opportunities to make friends, travel, enjoy healthy competition, and even make a name for themselves.

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Spring Break… what to do?

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Photo by Ibrahim Asad from Pexels

Spring Break.

These two words mean something different to everyone: road trips, beach days, sleeping in, camping, hiking, or maybe for you it means working extra hours to get ahead.

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10 Ways TBC Maintains a Safe Campus

img_912228129Safety is always important – no matter what you do or where you go.

Here at Trinity Baptist College we not only understand that, but we make it a priority to make our campus a safe, secure, and comfortable environment for students. We go the extra mile to make this campus a place where students can focus on their studies and their personal growth and not be hampered by safety concerns.

So what does that look like?  What measures does TBC employ to keep the campus a comfortable, friendly environment that still keeps a watchful eye?

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Book suggestions for the non-reader, the bookworm, and everyone in between

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Are you still working on your reading list for this year? 

Sometimes, trying to decide what to read is half the battle.  If you are not much of a reader, you may be hesitant to pick up a title without a solid recommendation.  On the other hand, if you are an avid reader, you may have such a long list of want-to-reads that you can’t make up your mind what to start next!  So many books; so little time.

In an attempt to eliminate some of the guesswork for you, we assembled a short list of titles to share below.  This list includes a variety of genres ranging from classic novels to Christian living, and most of them are fairly easy reads as well. 

We asked around and got input from our English department, our Administration, and even the students!  You may have already read many of these – or maybe not.  Either way, we hope you find something that sparks your interest.

Most of these titles can be found in digital and audio formats as well.  This makes it even more convenient for you!  Especially the audio format – you can listen while you walk to class, work out, or clean your dorm room! (Yes, that was a hint in case you were wondering.)

Leadership/Personal Growth:

  • How To Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
  • Ordering Your Private World by Gordon MacDonald
  • The Making of A Leader by Dr. J. Robert Clinton
  • Spiritual Leadership by J. Oswald Sanders
  • The One Thing by Gary Keller
  • Grit by Angela Duckworth

Inspirational/Devotional:

  • You Version Bible App Devotional Plans
  • New Morning Mercies by Paul Tripp
  • My Utmost For His Highest by Oswald Chambers
  • The Insanity of God by Nik Ripkin;
  • Knowing God by J.I. Packer
  • None Like Him: 10 Ways God Is Different from Us (and Why That’s a Good Thing) by Jen Wilkin

Biography/Autobiography:

  • Jonathan Edwards by Lain Murray
  • Bonhoeffer by Eric Metaxas
  • Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow
  • Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave by Frederick Douglass

Contemporary Fiction:

  • The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
  • A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman
  • Trevorode the Defender by Holly Bebernitz (former TBC professor)

Classics Everyone Should Read:

  • The Odyssey by Homer (translated by Emily Wilson)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  • My Antonia by Willa Cather
  • The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Do you have any more suggestions to add?  What other titles are on your reading list? 

 

*Note: TBC does not necessarily endorse the entire content of these books or other writings by these authors.  This list is provided as a starting reference to assist you in finding material that is helpful and/or of interest to you.

Three ways to maximize your study sessions.

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At this point in your life you are very familiar with classwork, exams, and, of course, studying.  If you’re in college, no doubt you are studying.  At least a little!  The question is, are you studying effectively?  Continue reading

Creating Opportunities for Real-World Experience

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Over the past several years, Trinity Baptist College has developed a strong relationship with nearby Crystal Springs Elementary (CSE).  Through the Federal Work Study Program and in collaboration with CSE, Trinity Baptist College was able to create a student employee position which simultaneously addresses tutoring needs in CSE and provides additional financial aid for a college student in the FWS program.

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Tiffani Edwards

Through this program, current TBC senior, Tiffani Edwards, tutored reading and math at CSE during the 2017-2018 school year.  Tiffani is an Elementary Education major and her dream is to work in the public school sector.  Talking about her experience at CSE, Tiffani smiled and said,

“I’ve had experience helping kids with homework before. But I feel like this really gave me a different perspective.  This is a bigger deal – the kids are being tested on this material.  Some of them are behind in certain areas and I had to figure out ways to fill in the gaps.”

Typically, she would tutor 4-6 students at a time.

“It wasn’t really the whole classroom concept of being a teacher yet, but it’s one step closer to that.”

The assistant principal at CSE was very pleased with Tiffani’s work and has requested more TBC students to fill tutoring positions.  Sashuas Rodriguez, an Elementary Special Education major at TBC, has accepted the tutoring position for the current (2018-2019) school year.

TBC Financial Aid Director Mark Elkins explains how this work study arrangement is of benefit to everyone involved.

The U.S. Department of Education indicates that a portion of TBC’s annual funding allocation in the Federal Work Study program must be dedicated to a wage match for a student(s) employed in a public service capacity involving reading and math tutoring.  So, this is really a win-win-win-win effort. CSE students receive one-on-one help with reading and math, CSE Administration have a dedicated reading and math tutor at no cost, a TBC student gains valuable hands-on experience as well as additional financial aid, and TBC is able to give back to the community.

We are privileged to be in the position to invest in our local Jacksonville community by providing quality tutors who can help young people grow academically.  In return, participating TBC students receive valuable real-world experience in their chosen area of study.  This kind of practical involvement paves the way for our education majors to graduate with qualifying resume credentials as well as a passion for education.

Off To College: One Thing You Can’t Afford To Leave Behind

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Have you looked at the calendar today?  Did you notice that there are only 5 more squares in July?

Five days before August hits in all it’s hot, busy, back-to-school fury.

For some, the conclusion of summer means cramming in a few more beach days, one more camping trip, or one more theme park adventure.  For others, it means cranking through just a couple more weeks of longer-than-usual work days to save up for the fall semester.

Emotions range from excitement to dread and everything in between… possibly ricocheting between the two extremes like an out-of-control bouncy-ball!

If you are beginning your freshman year at college, you are getting ready to launch out on your own.  This is true for both commuter students and campus residents.  While the change is more drastic when a student actually “moves out” for college, commuters also experiences a detachment from what (up until now) has been their typical family schedule.  This is a necessary, even healthy, part of the process of growing up and morphing into adulthood!

Naturally, becoming immersed in college will mean you become a bit less involved in life outside of college – especially as a campus resident.  Here at Trinity Baptist College, we encourage you to take full advantage of the spiritual culture of our campus by attending chapels and Bible studies and develop strong relationships by participating in activities and athletic events.  College can be so much more than an academic education if you allow it to be.  It can be the place where you meet life-long friends and make important connections that impact your life long after graduation.

There is a delicate balance, however, between full involvement in your college life and maintaining honest communication with family and mentors back home.  You may not grasp the importance of this now, but believe it – you need to keep in touch!  And not just because your family loves you and wants to hear from you! (Although that is a very valid reason, and one you need to remember!)

There is another — deeper — reason.  You will need advice. No matter how old you get or now experienced or mature – you will always need someone to speak into your life and offer a different perspective.

Proverbs 11:14 – Where no counsel is, the people fall: but in the multitude of counsellors there is safety.

Proverbs 19:20 – Hear counsel, and receive instruction, that thou mayest be wise in thy latter end.

Embracing your independence without dismissing the family members, friends, and mentors who have had a positive influence in your life before college is a tricky but important lesson to learn.  They are familiar with your background.  They have witnessed your strengths and weaknesses first hand and know you better than anyone on campus.  They can see how your struggles, triumphs, fears, and dreams make you unique.  They also can see your potential more clearly than most and genuinely desire your success.

Eventually, your new professors, friends, and mentors will come to know you as well.  They will hopefully speak into your life with wisdom and help you mature as a person.  But view these new influences as an addition to your support system instead of a replacement for what you already have in your parents and spiritual mentors.

Getting to college is a milestone to be proud of, certainly.  But don’t forget the valuable advice and support that got you to this point! You can’t afford to leave behind the wisdom and perspective that has been instrumental to your success so far!

Above all, don’t distance yourself from the ultimate source of wisdom for your life – God and His Word.  Even if all others fail you or steer you wrong, His wisdom transcends all.

Proverbs 1:7 – The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge: but fools despise wisdom and instruction.

What to pack for college dorm life?

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Starting to plan for dorm life?  You probably have questions. How in the world do you pack an entire life into one section of dorm room?  How do you decide what comes with you and what stays behind?  Should you bring your own microwave?  Ironing board?  Blender?  Trash can? What about a TV?

First of all, do not worry about packing your entire life into one section of dorm room!  If you live with your parents now, you are likely used to having an entire home at your disposal.  The thought of paring down to a few square feet may leave you panicked!  The truth is you don’t need any more room than that!  College life is busy and the more you have to keep track of, the less you can concentrate on what really matters – experiencing life!

Generally speaking, it is a good idea to wait on large items and appliances like microwaves and TVs.  If a roommate already has one, there might not be room (or need) for a second one!  This is also true for smaller items that can easily be shared, such as irons and trash cans.  Instead, think about items that are more essential to your personal day-to-day life.

Here are some essentials to consider as you make your shopping and packing list!

Laundry hamper – Everyone has to do laundry!  Might as well make it easy on yourself and get a hamper that allows you to carry things to the laundry room and back without dropping things all over the hall!  There are lots of options out there.  Some are almost completely collapsible and weigh close to nothing (basically a mesh pop-up container).  Others have more structure but still fold to save space.  Or you could go with a laundry basket that slides under your bed.  (Don’t forget the laundry detergent!)

Book bag – It might be worth investing in a quality one that you really like.  The cheaper ones tend to fall apart quickly and if you have to walk long distances every day it might take a toll on your back as well.  Keep in mind that you’ll likely be carrying several large books, possibly your laptop, and (especially if you’re a commuter) a water bottle… maybe lunch!  Look for something with a little structure to protect your computer.

Command hooks – Get them in a variety of sizes and shapes.  They are useful for so many things, don’t damage walls, and hold amazingly well!

Bed linens and towels – You can probably get by with a single set of bed linens.  You may want 2-3 sets of towels depending on how often you want to do laundry.  I don’t forget hand towels and wash cloths!

Flip-flops or shower shoes, a shower caddy, and a robe.  Depending on your dorm room set-up you’ll be sharing a shower with several people.  These items are always recommended!

Headphones/earbuds – Whether it is listening to music, plugging in to watch a video for class, or just trying to block out distractions while you study, they are a great investment!

Comfortable shoes – Walking will happen.  Might as well be comfortable!

We hope these suggestions will help you as you begin your college packing!  Do your best to pack lightly.  It is nearly inevitable that you will collect things as time goes by.  Remember that everything you bring with you will eventually have to move out again!

 

 

 

 

 

5 Things To Learn Before Moving Out

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Many times, going to college means “moving out.”  Moving out is exciting!  It means you’ve reached a new level of independence and maturity.  If that is where you find yourself today, congratulations!

You’ll find that independence and maturity don’t happen magically – they require responsibility.  And responsibility itself is a learning process!  Have you learned the basics of living on your own?  There’s a lot to learn!  But don’t worry – no one expects you to know it all right away.  Since we could never cover everything here, we have chosen five basic life skills that are a good idea to master before moving out on your own.   Not only will these skills make your life easier, but they also have the potential to make you a better roommate and a more capable adult!

  • Learn how to clean a bathroom. Traditionally, the bathroom is the room where we get clean.  But in order to be able to get yourself clean, the bathroom itself must first be clean.  Otherwise, it’s like washing a white shirt in the swamp.  Pointless and gross.  Showers, sinks, counters, mirrors, and floors – they all get nasty if you don’t clean them.  And toilets… well, let’s just say that toilets need to be cleaned regularly (trust me!).  And before you make excuses about not having time to clean… in reality, it only takes 3-4 minutes to clean any one area of the bathroom (provided you do it regularly and you don’t have to chisel 2 inches of grime off the tiles.)

If you’ve never cleaned a bathroom and feel the need for guidance, you don’t even have to ask your mom to teach you – you can look it up on Youtube!  This one shows you how to clean a toilet in less than 3 minutes.

  • Learn how to make an appointment (and keep it). No, this isn’t a joke! Have you ever made an appointment on your own?  Making an appointment is simple enough, but you’ll need to know several things before making that call.  For example: you’ll need to know what days/times you’re available (take into account the time it takes to get there and back), how long the appointment may last, and what kind of transportation is available to you.  This applies to everything from a meeting with your professor to a job interview or doctor’s appointment.  If it is a doctor’s appointment, you will likely need to have cash or a card on hand to make a payment.  If you don’t make your appointment on time, the office or individual waiting for you has every right to move on. When that happens, you’ll have to reschedule, which is a big pain.  Also, be aware that most medical offices charge a no-show fee.  That’s an even bigger pain.  Biggest lesson here: plan ahead.  Do what it takes to make it there. If you don’t think you can make it, call ahead to cancel or re-schedule.

Speaking of doctors…

  • Learn how to use your insurance. Let’s just be honest for a moment: health insurance is a royal pain.  No one is denying that or expecting you to know all the details of your particular plan.  That being said, it is highly recommended that you know your provider (name of the insurance company) and carry proof of insurance in your wallet (usually a credit-card sized card that lists all the basic information and numbers to call with questions).   Do you know how to find a doctor in your insurance plan?  Do you know if your plan requires a co-pay?  Or is it a high-deductible plan (you pay a bit more out of pocket)?  These are all things you’ll need to know when making a doctor’s appointment.
  • Learn when to go to bed and the importance of getting up on time.   Make yourself get up on time.  You’ll be less likely to forget what you need and more likely to make a good impression (either in a class presentation or in that chance encounter with your crush).  And if you budget your time well, you’ll find there is also time to goof off and have fun!
  • Learn to memorize. Your social security number.  Your pin number.  Your bank account number. Your license plate number. Important phone numbers.    Phone numbers.  Think parents, siblings, and close friends. These days there is little need to commit contact numbers and addresses to memory since we can just look them up on our phones!  But what if you drop your phone in the toilet?  (Go ahead and laugh – you know it happens!)  What if you lose it on a hiking trip or you drop it trying to take that perfect selfie at the pool and it sinks under six feet of chlorinated water?  What is your backup plan for contacting family if you can’t access your phone? Knowing one person’s phone number can be a lifesaver.

Don’t let life catch you by surprise!  Do your best to plan in advance so you can enjoy your independence confidently!  On the other hand, try not to be intimidated by what you don’t know.  Be willing to ask for help.  Everyone needs help at some point.  One day, you’ll be the one helping a freshman figure out their insurance card!

Three tips for every commuter student

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Often, moving out is assumed when people talk about going to college.  However, that is not always the case

In fact, statistics show that the commuter student population is over half that of on-campus students.  Curious?  You can read a US news article about that here.  Of course, this data will vary drastically depending on the university or college in question, and the percentage of commuter students tends to be lowest in the freshman class.  (This might be because many colleges and universities require freshmen to live on campus.)

Wondering why some colleges require freshmen to live on campus?  It’s actually for your own benefit!  Here’s a quick list of solid reasons why it’s a good idea.

Commuter students face a unique set of challenges. 

We met with a commuter student at TBC and her observations echoed that of many other commuters across the country.  There are some obvious perks to living at home and driving to class each day, but there are three main areas that are unique challenges for the off-campus student.   If you are planning to commute and want to get the most out of your college experience, these are three areas that you should consider as you plan your days.

  • Get involved. It takes extra effort to truly get to know fellow classmates and professors and be familiar with campus facilities and events. To be an active participant in college life outside of the classroom, you’ll need to be strategic.  It is easy to just go to class and leave, but by doing that you’re missing out on many of the experiences that make college so exciting.  On-campus students tend to spend a majority of their time together in the dining hall, in the library, walking back and forth to class, in the activity buildings, attending campus events, and, of course, in their dorm or other student housing.  Relationships are built during those times, and you’ll need to intentionally plug in to the campus culture and community outside of class.  It is not impossible, but it can be difficult if you aren’t naturally outgoing.

Helpful tip: Purposefully meet fellow freshmen as well as upperclassmen during orientation and build on those connections.  Freshmen will likely be slightly out of their comfort zone (but the same boat as you!) and you will likely all have a very similar schedule. Chances are, you’ll see each other frequently and probably have multiple classes together.  Upperclassmen will have the inside scoop on how things work and what to expect.  It’s always advisable to have more mature people in your life who can share their experiences and perspective.  Look for those good influences that you can depend on!

  • Traffic is unpredictable.  Depending on your distance from campus you’ll need take into account rush hours and possible traffic flow obstacles (accidents, construction, special events, etc.) Each semester, class schedules change and demand that the commuter student learn a new routine.  Don’t let this discourage you from your goal!  Hundreds of college students accept this challenge every day and pass with flying colors.  Just make a point to give yourself extra time, especially on days when you have an exam or a project is due.  Being late is never a good idea, but it is a really bad idea to be late on a day when a grade-defining event is on the schedule.

Helpful tip: For the first week or two, plan to give yourself way more travel time that you actually need to get to campus and find your classroom.  Get familiar with your route and take note of any rail road crossings or school zones.  If you encounter either of those on your way to campus, you may need to scope out alternate routes to keep in mind if needed.  If you arrive on campus with 30 minutes to spare, take advantage of that time to roam campus and get familiar with the layout.  Or look for a familiar face and start a conversation! 

  • Even if you commute from home, you may need to plan your own meals. It might work out perfectly for you to run home for lunch or dinner, but then again it might not.  Classes, homework, work schedules, and campus activities can conflict with home routines. Meals could easily be one of the main changes you’ll need to account for.  (Skipping meals shouldn’t be part of your plan!)

Helpful tip: Look into the possibility of paying for a meal service plan.  Making a stop at the college cafeteria could be the perfect answer to a crazy class schedule, and most likely be cheaper than buying snacks every day.  (Healthier too, if you choose wisely in the cafeteria!)  Another option would be to pack your own meals to bring with you.  Take that extra money you’ve saved and use it to knock out that college bill!  

In the end, your college experience can be what you want it to be. 

If you want to have a positive experience, make the extra effort to make it so!  Keeping these three points in mind as you make plans can go a long way toward creating the experience you are looking for.  Ask questions, look for creative solutions, and enjoy this exciting phase of life!